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vote on something then. the senate could also pass it and signed into law. gregg: right. >> everyone is talking about there is not enough time. this is not true. congress can do whatever it wants. if they agree, the two parties agree congress can pass things very quickly the trick is getting both sides to agree. gregg: it is always small ball and it is never really significant. which shows an utter lack of courage. and the american people, you know, feel that way too about their representatives. put up on the "gallup poll." "gallup poll", likelihood of averting the fiscal cliff. there you see, susan, people are losing faith. i'm actually surprised that they haven't lost all faith. >> actually i was going to say the same thing. i think that number is pretty surprising. i would think it is much higher at this point. perhaps the public is getting used to this kind of game they play chicken and at the last second they come up with a deal. remember august 2011, we thought the nation was running out of money, we would hit the debt ceiling, government would partially shut down, literally at
, at least 10 states have passed laws that require people to show a government- issued photo id when they go to the polls. while supporters say the laws protect against voter fraud, others argue they're more likely to suppress voter turnout among people of color, the poor and proper id and find it harder to obtain one. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on monday, naacp president and ceo ben jealous made voting rights the center of his address to the group's annual convention in houston. >> we have a choice to make. we can allow this election to be stolen in advance, as politicians from pennsylvania and recently bragged about money thought no one was listening. talking about his state's voter id law. we can double down on democracy. and overcome the rising tide of voter suppression with a higher daughter of voter registration and mobilization and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his lif
's a law passed that ensures 98% of americans know their taxes are not going to go up in just under two weeks. he also wants to make sure that 2 million americans who would otherwise lose their unemployment benefits if we went over the fiscal cliff would be able to keep those benefits. and finally he says, look, we can take a look at the longer term proposals, the larger reform at a later point. just lay the ground work at this point. we also know before the president left, he talked by phone with house speaker john boehner. he met in person with harry reid, although what the private happened, we don't know. but publicly things sound a lot like they have for the past few weeks. take a listen. >> every member of congress believes that, every democrat, every republican. so there is absolutely no rea n reason, none, not to protect these americans from a tax hike. at the very least, let's agree right now what we already agree on. let's get that done. >> what the president has offered so far simply won't do anything to solve our spending problem and begin to address our nation's crippling d
to necessarily reduce violence. skepticism is there. 50% of people thought stricter gun laws would have no effect on violence like at sandy hook. 16% said it would have a little. quarter thought it would have a lot of effect. skepticism of the gun control laws itself. broader problem and we should address it as a broader problem. >> doug: the players -- >> the players, 2016 factors in. >> a lot of guys are senators and will be worried about the primaries. marco rubio. he could be important. he has b-plus rating with the nra. what does he do? is he for whatever the steps are to move forward on gun control? that could be a problem for him in 2016. on the other hand, if he says with the nra, if they don't move, if there is no move fire department them and he stays with them and builds up his nra rating for the primary, of 2016, given he may be running for president, that may help him in primary. but with this environment, it could hurt him in the general election. that is not just him. a lot of the members. you are a senator from virginia, mark warner. are you going to step up, lead on gun control i
, you cannot harass, you cannot intimidate. and before you make any changes in election laws dealing with registration, changing a precinct, local lines for any political position, you have to get pre-clearance from the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black belt of alabama-the home county of mrs. martin luther king jr., the home county of mrs. ralph abernathy, the home county of mrs. andrew young. and because of what happened to him, we made a decision to march. i
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
, then say, how can you be in a congress? who got arrested? you violated the laws. and i said, they were proud laws. their customs, they were tradition and we wanted america to be better. we wanted america to live it to the declaration of independence, live up to or create them make real our democracy. take it off of people and make it real. so when i got arrested the first time, i felt free. i felt liberated and today more than ever before, i feel free and liberated. you know, abraham lincoln 150 years ago freed the slaves. but it took the modern-day civil rights movement to free and liberate a nation. [applause] now i know some of you are asking, where did you get the name "across that bridge"? where did you get the title from? life lessons and a vision for change. take a few short years ago that this is an election year. hundreds of dozens of million people from virginia to texas. could not register to the based on the color of their skin. people stood in line. we take a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 and the voting age population more than 450,000, but only 1
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7